Dance of Ecstasy

Dance of Ecstasy

Regular price
'Dhol baaje, dhol baaje dhol
Ke dham dham dham baaje dhole'
The sound of the dhol (traditional Indian drum) and the Indian dancers moving to the beat of the dhol is captured in this piece. It depicts the richness of Indian culture in bright shades of scarlet red and permanent yellow.
I was envisioning a woman with kohl applied black eyes and garland decorated black tresses with a bindiya on her forehead and tinklets on her ankles.
I have tried to capture the extravagance and energy with which Indian dancers move rhythmically and passionately. Painted against a background of rich grey and black, the dancers stand out beautifully catching one's eye with admiration and joy at the liveliness of the painting. Women draped in Indian sarees and men in Dhotis the painting stresses Indian art, culture and dress.
Song & Dance 
Song-and-dance routine is an intrinsic part of Bollywood because cinema derives its base from folk theatre. As a Bombay girl, I soak in the music, which has been created to dance to or facilitate the expression of certain feelings or emotions instantaneously.
In India films are a newer variation of folk theatre or jatra/nautanki as they were termed. Jatra or the folk plays have been widely accepted as forms of entertainment in rural India. A combination of music, dance and dramatics, they work as a complete package like musicals in the West. 
An evolved version of this, cinema too followed this scheme of things. Hence, now we have a song to explain a situation, a dance to take the story forward, a performance to connect the stories etc. 
With time, new reasons and angles have resulted in the evolution of this song-and-dance routine, which by now has become an inseparable part of Hindi cinema.
Expressionism
 In the earlier days of cinema in India, song and dance were used to express emotions that prose & acting could not. From national integration to lust and of course romance these were conveyed using beautiful lyrics set to soul-stirring melodies.
Escapism
A lot of Indian audiences wants an escape from their lives when they go to a cinema hall instead of seeing someone else's reality. Song and dance sequences make a good means to reach that end.
 
Hypocrisy
India has a patriarchal society. The men control money and are the major market for movies. Hence the item-numbers, or hit musical performances, are mostly directed at them. At the same time, people who object,  object only with meager voices. In most cases, they do not really mind watching the item numbers themselves and will even pay to watch. At the very least, they will not protest very loudly - if a popular song assaults their sensibilities or if it spoils the mood of an otherwise good movie.